Of course they named the third Chopin rhythm game Fred3ric

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Image for article titled Of Course They Named Chopin's Third Rhythm Game Fred3ric

I love the 18th century composer Frederic Chopin. I like video games. I really like video games with Frédéric Chopin. With the release of Fred3ric, available now on the Nintendo Switch eShop, Forever Entertainment consolidates its position as the most prolific Chopin video game producer in the world. They made it three, beating Bandai Namco (Eternal Sonata) and the Bloober team (Music Master: Chopin).

To bring you up to speed, Chopin worked his way out of his grave in the rhythm game 2012 Frédéric: the resurrection of music. Then he fought catchier modern arrangements of his renowned compositions in 2014 Frederic: Evil Strikes Back. In this new sequel, he faces his greatest threat, cybernetically enhanced versions of history’s greatest composers.

Image for article titled Of Course They Named Chopin's Third Rhythm Game Fred3ric

Fred3ric once again pits time-displaced punk-composer Chopin against the evil cybernetic god Zeitgeist. Even though his previous plans to ruin Chopin by pitting him against other musicians in rhythm game duels failed twice, Zeitgeist does it a third time, as he is a machine and not a very original thinker.

Image for article titled Of Course They Named Chopin's Third Rhythm Game Fred3ric

Screenshot: Kotaku

What is different are Chopin’s adversaries. Instead of fighting against modern musical genres personified by parodies of pop stars, he takes on Mozart, Beethoven and Bach. Zeitgeist pulls great composers through time, cybernetically augments them, and unleashes them on poor Freddie Chops.

Bach becomes Hyper JSBach, ultra keyboardist. Beethoven’s well-documented hearing loss is no problem for Ludvig Van Cyborg, hyper uber-Beethoven with cyber-hearing.

Image for article titled Of Course They Named Chopin's Third Rhythm Game Fred3ric

Screenshot: Kotaku

Previous entries in the Frederic The series enticed players to listen to poppy medleys of Chopin’s music. Fred3ric diverts the music of Chopin’s adversaries into pretty medleys. Beethoven’s Scene, for example, features a wonderful combination of his Fifth Symphony with “Ode to Joy.” In the Norwegian composer Edvard Grieg scene is a wonderful mix of several songs that I know but don’t know the name of because it’s Edvard Grieg. It’s good material.

Fred3ricRhythm game fights are standard stuff. The notes are falling, hit the right buttons in the right order to keep your score above your opponent’s. Players can use buttons to represent notes on Chopin’s keyboards, but the game was designed for touch controls. Setting the switch down and playing it with your fingertips pressing the screen feels much more natural. Unfortunately I can’t record footage from the Switch when it’s undocked, so imagine the screen below is playing.

Image for article titled Of Course They Named Chopin's Third Rhythm Game Fred3ric

Fred3ric is short and sweet. There are only eight stages to master, and mastery comes fairly quickly for players with even a rudimentary knowledge of classical music. There is no learning curve for learning new songs like in other rhythm games. These are familiar tunes performed by familiar faces with bizarre cybernetic enhancements.

With its animated cartoon cutscenes, goofy sense of humor, and absurd treatment of the greatest musical artists in history, Fred3ric continues to tell the weird joke that Forever Entertainment started telling in 2012 with The resurrection of music. I’m still riveted.

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